Custom Logo Patches No Minimum..

Custom Design Patches – Netpropatches.Com

Sometimes embroidering directly onto a garment is impractical, impossible or simply ineffective. Creating your own embroidered patches is a simple alternative for these situations. You can directly sew your design into organza fabric rather than a finished garment. These can then be cut out into patches and sewn onto almost anything. They’re simple to create and surprisingly beautiful, with results quite similar to their traditionally embroidered counterparts. And with this method of embroidery, you can precisely position without opening seams, embroidering over lumpy seam allowances or worrying about exact placement when hooping.

What you should need – Besides general machine embroidery supplies (top quality backing, embroidery design, thread, embroidery needles), you’ll need polyester organza to serve as being a base to stitch on. One additional item can help you make perfect appliques: a heat tool. This may be considered a wood-burning tool, a stencil cutter or a multi-purpose tool (offered by most craft stores).

The temperature tools have different tips, and you’ll probably realize that the main one with a very sharp point is easiest to handle. This tool will melt away excess organza across the away from the embroidery, leaving the outlines intact and providing a soft and pliable applique you can attach to just about anything. Have a very damp sponge in your work area while melting the organza to wash the tip from the tool and take off any melted organza that might otherwise stain the embroidery thread

Designs – Nearly every design can be a patch. Whenever you evaluate a design, try to find open areas or any parts of straight stitching that may be troublesome. Resist the obvious thought to remove tile organza across the straight stitching. Straight stitching isn’t stable enough to withstand wear and tear, and also the organza could eventually work its way out from under tile stitches. It’s also advisable to leave the organza within the open work areas.

Organza is very stable and stands up well to some heavy stitch count design. Dark colors will show through with light colored thread, so choose a neutral color organza that can work well with a lot of designs. Leave the organza in the open parts of tile design to incorporate dimension and stability.

Although a great base fabric for embroidered patches, organza still needs to be stabilized. Use either water-soluble backing or a professional-quality, tear-away backing. Make an effort to match the backing towards the garment fabric and so the design will blend into the background. Usually one layer will suffice, but if the stitch count warrants a heavier backing, use multiple layers. It is going to still provide a soft, pliable applique. Hoop the backing and organza together in a hoop big enough to allow for the embroidered design.

Note: Slippery organza will likely be much easier to hoop should you first adhere it for the backing using a temporary spray adhesive.

After the design is stitched on the organza, take it out of the hoop, and gently remove excess backing from tile back. Remove all backing before melting the organza. The backing will leave a gummy residue on the heat tool and can mar the embroidery. Use tweezers to eliminate any backing caught in small areas. Although it’s generally not suggested to clip the tlrreads on tile back of the design, clip any that may show on the front. Leave some thread tails that can be tucked behind the applique once you attach it for the garment. Utilize the heat tool to get rid of excess organza from across the fringe of your design. Here is the exact same technique used qawntn professionally manufactured custom embroidered patches.

Run the tool approximately 1/8″ out of the design edges. Don’t get too close, as polyester embroidery threads will melt out of this source of heat. Rayon embroidery thread can better withstand the warmth from the tool. When the organza is melted, the applique boasts stable edges and secure outlines.

Attaching the patches you’ve created – Only use a thread color that suits the design and style outline. Then machine stitch appliques in position using a narrow zigzag. Or hand-sew to secure using small overcast stitches.

On sleeves or pant legs, the circumference could be the deciding factor for how an applique is attached. For example, on the featured garment, too-narrow sleeves prohibited machine-applied appliques. When attaching multiple appliques on one garment, utilize the same technique throughout to get the best overall appearance. Once each of the appliques will be in place, attach any desired trims and buttons.